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Face 2 Face with David Peck

I believe that good conversation can create change. They can also be fun and engaging, full of insights and unexpected outcomes. And you're never quite sure where they're going to lead. Intimate dialogue assumes authenticity, transparency and dealing with substantive and sometimes difficult questions. I try to do that with Face2Face.
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Face 2 Face with David Peck
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Now displaying: 2017
Aug 23, 2017

Peter Gajdics talks about "The Inheritance of Shame", dealing with trauma, surviving conversion therapy and how remembering helps in his recovery.

Photo by Erich Saide Photographer

Biography

Peter Gajdics (pronounced “Guy-ditch”) was born and raised in Vancouver, Canada, to immigrant parents from Europe. Gajdics knew from an early age that he was gay, but, for myriad reasons, that truth only seemed to cause him pain. In his early 20s, while struggling with an overwhelming sense of shame, Gajdics turned to a local psychiatrist for help. Within months he found himself embroiled in a bizarre sort of conversion therapy that attempted to “cure” him of his homosexuality. The Inheritance of Shame documents Gajdics’ six-year journey through, and eventually out of, this therapy; the legal battle with his former psychiatrist; his complicated family history; and his attempts to reclaim his life—and, most especially, his truth. 

Peter is an award-winning writer whose essays, short memoir and poetry have appeared in, among others, The AdvocateNew York TyrantThe Gay and Lesbian Review / WorldwideCosmonauts Avenue, and Opium. He is a recipient of writers grants from Canada Council for the Arts (for non-fiction and fiction), a fellowship from The Summer Literary Seminars, and an alumni of Lambda Literary Foundation’s “Writers Retreat for Emerging LGBT Voices.” The Inheritance of Shame: A Memoir is his first book.

Peter Gajdics is available for speaking engagements. Reach out to him through the below contact page.

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For more information about David Peck's podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here or check out the site of his podcast on film, social change and much more

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

Aug 16, 2017

Tanya and Face2Face host David Peck talk about mutual trust, Smart Risks, peace-building, mattresses, innovation and a grassroots manifesto for change.

Biography

Tanya Cothran is Executive Administrator at Spirit in Action International, a granting organization that supports community organizations and individuals in Kenya, Malawi, and Uganda.

She started working for Spirit in Action in 2007.

In 2009, she completed her Masters in Library and Information Science at St. Catherine University in St. Paul, Minnesota.

She grew up in California and moved to Toronto, ON in 2012.

More about the book here.

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For more information about David Peck's podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here or check out the site of his podcast on film, social change and much more.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

Image Copyright: Tonya Cothran. Used with permission.

 

Aug 9, 2017

Chris and Face2Face host David Peck talk about engaged Buddhism, Cambodia, power and politics, photographs as symbols and hope.

Trailer

Synopsis

Fading from black, the frame fills with the image of a rice field, leaves of grass billow in the wind. Cut to construction along the Mekong river in the capital Phnom Penh. On the soundtrack the metronome of steel girders being pushed deep into the ground keeps time. In the foreground a young man prepares to cast his fishing net into the river as an old sampan fishing boat chugs by.

In the background a new bridge is under construction, the sound of which marks the unsteady pace of progress in Cambodia. The film is an intimate portrait of three Cambodian’s involved in forced evictions. We meet the characters at the very beginning of their journey, unsure of themselves and unaware of where they will end up after years of protests against their government.

Biography

Chris is an award-winning video journalist and documentary filmmaker and the founder of Little Ease Films. He has spent the last nine years making his first feature documentary ‘A Cambodian Spring’.

He is a regular contributor to the Guardian newspaper and in 2014 produced an award-winning undercover investigation into slavery in the Thai fishing industry.

His work has taken him as far afield as South Sudan, Burma, the Philippines, Laos and Thailand.

He is currently developing an animated feature film about slavery in the Thai fishing industry, a feature documentary about a young Irish man who went to fight Assad in Syria and a Virtual Reality computer game about slavery and migration.

More about Chris Kelly here.

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For more information about David Peck's podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here or check out the site of his podcast on film, social change and much more.

 

 

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

 

Image Copyright: Eye Steel Films and Chris Kelly. Used with permission.

Aug 2, 2017

Kelita and Face2Face host David Peck talk about country music, trauma, suicide, resilience, and the importance of story telling, listening and how we can break the “cycle”.

More about Kelita’s new album project here.

Biography

KELITA writes, sings and speaks from her own life experiences, sharing her powerful and inspiring healing journey. Coming from a life of countless tragedies and family dysfunction, she shares the lessons of overcoming and victory with an endearing transparency and honesty that engages, encourages and inspires.

Her ability to touch and penetrate the hearts of audiences is what drives her success. KELITA’s is a message that rings true and pours out through the words she shares from her inner being. She has the innate ability to write, sing and speak what others are feeling.

From her imaginary stage in the hayloft of the big barn of her parents’ Claresholm, Alberta ranch, she began to sing at the age of four under the yard light that was her first “spotlight”. Her love of music and performing were KELITA’s escapes from many significant traumatic family experiences and abuse during her early childhood and teen years. In fact, it was those escapes that fine-tuned a dream that she would “one day be a star” – a reality that continues to expand after decades of performance.

Talent, captivating performance and charisma is what attracts the following that KELITA has garnered over her career. From hilarious character comedy delivered by her host of zany unique characters to beautifully written and sung folk/pop/kinda ‘gospelly’ songs to heart wrenching ballads that deeply stir emotions, KELITA’s versatility and diversity causes her to captivate the hearts of her listeners and open up minds to messages with universal appeal.

While climbing to the top of her field, a near fatal automobile accident saw KELITA’s personal life and music career take a dramatic turn. Combining a pending recording contract with Capital Records, Nashville, lost as a result of Capital’s corporate restructuring, along with dissolving a thirteen-year relationship with her husband/manager, you would think that would be enough to crush anyone’s dreams. Instead, it was a time of great soul-searching for KELITA and out of the ashes, a stronger, more resilient and transparent singer, songwriter emerged.

The songs she began to write were not only skillful, but honest, open-hearted and reflective. This new resonance with the heart attracted collaborations with Canadian greats; Michael Burgess, Susan Aglukark (KELITA helped Susan write the hit song “Breaking Down” and “Kathy I” for her Triple Platinum Album “This Child”) and others, as well as a number of notable organizations.

A few years later KELITA met and married multi-talented musician/producer/arranger Gord Lemon, who then became her producer and co-writer. Musically, their first project garnered them KELITA’s signature hit country song “The Strong One”. Together they have created and produced all of KELITA’s award winning music including Juno nominated “Naked Soul” and Canadian Gospel Music Association’s Inspirational Album of the Year, “Because of Love”.

Inspired by her deep understanding of the hurt and pain associated with childhood trauma, KELITA has developed a passion for women, children and social justice. Over a period of several years, led by her dedication and humanitarian efforts, her critically acclaimed album “Heavenly Night” and initiative project of the same name raised both awareness and $250,000 for the rehabilitation of young children rescued from child exploitation in Cambodia. KELITA has also contributed to the healing of childhood wounds for men and women around the globe through her Award-Winning songs “Bella” and “Deep Dark Secret”.

KELITA speaks to the acknowledgement, empathy and the very real struggle of overcoming adversity. It has become commonplace for her audience to bestow virtues on KELITA for her music helping them through hardships, illness or seemingly insurmountable life challenges. As more than one of her fans have proclaimed; “Your music literally has saved my life!” KELITA is not just an immensely talented singer, songwriter, speaker and comedienne, she is an exceptional woman who is a compassionate artistic vessel who is used to powerfully impact and touch the human spirit.

Learn more about Kelita here.

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For more information about David Peck's podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here or check out the site of his podcast on film, social change and much more.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

 

Jul 26, 2017

Heather and Face2Face host David Peck talk about greed, activism and sweatshops and her new film Complicit and why consumers have so much power when it comes to making a difference.

Trailer

IMDB

TIFF

Synopsis:

The documentary follows the intimate journey of Chinese migrant worker Yi Yeting, a benzene-poisoned victim-turned-activist who takes on the global electronic industry. While struggling to survive his own work-induced leukemia, he brings his fight against benzene from his hospital room where he helps other workers, to Silicon Valley and the international stage. Yi's efforts along with the support of others, ultimately contributes to Apple banning two of the most toxic chemicals, benzene and n-hexane, in its final assembly.

Against huge odds Yi directly confronts corporate and government interests, while empowering and inspiring the people around him. His wife Liu Huihui, a stay-at-home mom, goes undercover to investigate an Apple supplier. Xiao Ya, an teenager rural migrant, who arrives in the city with hopes and dreams of a working "paradise" that she's imagined since she was a kid.

Tragically she gets poisoned on her first job by n-hexane, a solvent she used in polishing iPhone screens, at a hidden Apple subcontractor. Inspired by Yi, she starts to help other sick workers. Ming Kunpeng, another benzene-poisoned protagonist we meet through Yi, can't bear the burden his illness places on his family, and commits suicide.

Shot under the radar and with incredible access, the film explores global brands' social responsibly and consumers' role, while offering an in-depth look into love, family, Chinese culture, and the people sacrificing everything to make a difference.

Biography

Heather White is a first-time documentary director. From 2011-2014 she was a Network Fellow at Harvard Universityʼs Edmond Safra Center for Ethics, researching potential conflicts of interest in independent monitoring models of supply chain risk.

She is the founder and former Executive Director (1995-2005) of www.verite.org, a respected non-profit organization recognized for its groundbreaking leadership in the areas of independent monitoring and factory social audits.

During her tenure at Verité she advised companies such as adidas-Solomon, The Body Shop, Marks and Spencer, Macyʼs, The Gap and the Ethical Trading Initiative (ETI).

More here on the website about the campaign and film.

 

Jul 19, 2017

Anna Jane Edmonds, Karl Janisse and Zach Ramelan and Face2Face host David Peck talk about immersive storytelling, collaboration and inclusion, globalization and how movies can in fact change the world.

More about Blackout Media here on the website.

Biographies

Anna Jane (AJ) Edmonds is an emerging leader in the film industry, working in Toronto and Los Angeles as a producer and idea creator for movies with an edge. After working on set with a number of Toronto based film productions, in 2014 she secured the opportunity to work at Silver Pictures Entertainment and be a part of its management and development team during the production of the films THE NICE GUYS and COLLIDE. 

Zach Ramelan is an award winning independent filmmaker from Ontario, Canada. From the age of 17, Zach has pursued his passion as a full time filmmaker. Since then he has created several award-winning short films, music videos and feature films. His music videos have enabled him to collaborate with international artists such as Sixx AM and FlyLeaf.

After the success and global distribution of his feature film, DEAD RUSH, Zach is looking forward to working on his next big project! Zach runs a popular Youtube channel on filmmaking tips and tricks called "Film Freak" with over 13,000 followers. 

Karl Janisse was born and raised in Burlington, ON. Karl Janisse has been working professionally in film and television from the age of 18. He now works as a Cinematographer and Independent Producer in Toronto. 

He values above all else, the importance of a meaningful story, and the impact it can have on people. He is constantly pursuing how the art of filmmaking can expand our minds; and strives for unique photography that can tell a captivating story. His notable work includes feature films such as Dead Rush and The Hexecutioners and commercial clients like Tesla and Coca-Cola, and is an associate member of the Canadian Society of Cinematographers

Jul 14, 2017

Vaden Earle and Face2Face host David Peck talk about human rights, statelessness, change, immigration policy and the current state of affairs in Canada.

Link to ONE Vaden’s must have book.

Biography

As a motivator, Vaden has the incredible talent of releasing vision and purpose in others, as his life message is all about making vision a reality, and not giving up until the end result is in your grasp.  

As an innovative forward thinker, Vaden has a knack to stay ahead of the curve and continually come up with initiatives that are relevant and timely.

As a speaker, his dynamic and avant-garde approach is sure to activate his audience, and yet his unaffected manner will keep them at ease, and assure them that change really is possible.

As a writer, Vaden has an incredible ability to bring stories to life in such a way that the reader cannot help but be inspired.

Having received and been nominated for numerous speaking and entrepreneurial awards, Vaden has accumulated vast amounts of experience in a relatively small amount of time.  He has spoken and travelled with teams all over Canada and the United States, Europe, Asia and the Caribbean, and is also a leader in his own community. He has consulted for World Vision, been a keynote speaker for Home Depot Canada, CSLC (Canadian Student Leadership Conference), the Millennium Scholarship Foundation as well as numerous other leadership events and social justice conferences including speeches on Parliament Hill.

Vaden has exceptional skills in developing high-level relationships as well as corporate associations and partnerships. During his time as CEO in the non-profit sector, Vaden cultivated corporate relationships with numerous major national and multinational corporations. During this same period his fundraising efforts totalled over thirty million dollars and he was also a direct consultant for various Members of Parliament.

Vaden has also been featured on several television programs and radio interviews, and his materials have been used in numerous books and publications. In 2007, Vaden authored a bestselling social justice book entitled One: A Face behind the Numbers. This book hit number one on Amazon in under four hours solely on sales made from Vaden’s social media contacts. The book later went on to be named as the Social Justice Curriculum in numerous school districts across Canada and The United States.

There are many who credit the recent rise in Canadian “voluntourism” to Vaden’s efforts and writing, as no other group has hosted humanitarian trips to the scale that his group has.

And more about Widlene here.

 

Jul 12, 2017

Josh Freed and Face2Face host David Peck talk about “line regret”, “queue science”, cars as “me” vehicles, occupied time and why Brits like to talk to strangers.

Synopsis:

All over the world people are lined up now - millions, maybe billions of us - losing trillions of hours of our time. We line up at hospitals, banks, border crossings, supermarkets, trains, planes and fast food chains. In fact, for over 50 years queue designers have been trying to conquer the queue, in vast, largely secret worldwide experiments - and the lab rats in the maze are us.

THE TAMING OF THE QUEUE travels from Canada to England and India to look at how humans behave in queues. It looks at the boredom, frustration, stress, fatigue and fury we all feel in line-ups, as our fast-paced lives slow to a crawl.

Biography

Josh Freed, the Montreal-based writer/director of THE TAMING OF THE QUEUE, is an award-winning filmmaker, writer and journalist. His documentary films have been seen in over 50 countries, and include Deluged by Data (for which he won a 2016 Writers Guild of Canada award in the Documentary category); The Good, the Bad and the Bike (as narrator/on-camera host of this 2016 Radio-Canada documentary);  Life Below Zero; The Trouble With Experts; Where Did I Put…My Memory? My Messy Life; China’s Sexual Revolution; In Search of Sleep - An Insomniac’s Journey; Coat of Many Colours; To Kill or To Cure; Polar Bear Safari; and Juggling Dreams in Mongolia.

For his writing, Freed has won two National Newspaper Awards as Best Canadian Columnist for his weekly column in the Montreal Gazette. He is also the author of several popular books, including Moonwebs; Vive Le Quebec Freed; The Anglo Guide to Survival in Quebec; and Fear of Frying, which won him the Stephen Leacock Prize for humour.

His theatre projects include co-writing and co-starring in the hit play Four Anglos of the Apocalypse, for the Centaur Theatre in Montreal, and The 25th Century Belongs To Canada, which also had a successful run at the Centaur.

Learn more about Josh here.

And more about the film here.

Trailer

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For more information about David Peck's podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit his site here.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

Image Copyright: Josh Freed. Used with permission.

 

Jul 5, 2017

Zaradasht Ahmed and Face2Face host David Peck talk about his film “Nowhere to Hide”, the Iraq War and the Triangle of Death, compassion and humanizing the victims of the ongoing conflict.

More here on the website about the film.

Trailer

IMDB

Synopsis:

Nowhere to Hide follows male nurse Nori Sharif through five years of dramatic change, providing unique access into one of the world’s most dangerous and inaccessible areas – the “triangle of death” in central Iraq.

Initially filming stories of survivors and the hope of a better future as American and Coalition troops retreat from Iraq in 2011, conflicts continue with Iraqi militias, and the population flees accompanied by most of the hospital staff.

Nori is one of the few who remain. When ISIS advances on Jalawla in 2014 and takes over the city, he too must flee with his family at a moment’s notice, and turns the camera on himself.

Biography

Director and Photographer Zaradasht Ahmed is a Kurdish/Norwegian filmmaker. He was born and raised in Northern Iraq.

His latest work “Nowhere to Hide” has won multiple awards including the IDFA Award for Best Feature Documentary and the One World Human Rights Film Festival Award for Best Documentary.

Earlier works include the award-winning documentary Road to Diyarbakir, and Fata Morgana. Zaradasht has many years of experience working with documentary filmmaking in the Middle East, North-Africa, and Asia, as well as training local people in documentation.

Jun 28, 2017

 

Nathan Fitch and Face2Face host David Peck talk about his new film Island Soldier, the US military and Micronesian soldiers, service, hope and economics.

Trailer

IMDB

More about the film here on the website.

Synopsis:

ISLAND SOLDIER follows members of the Nena family from one of the most remote islands in the world to the training grounds of Texas and the battlefields in Afghanistan. The death of Sapuro “Sapp” Nena in Afghanistan makes waves through his tiny home island of Kosrae - where nearly everyone is connected to the U.S. Military directly or through family members.

In an attempt to heal from his own deep wounds, Sapuro’s best friend in the Army, Mario Robles, heads to Kosrae with his family to meet Sapp’s parents for the first time and pay his respects on Veteran’s Day.

It is an emotional gathering of two families, from opposite sides of the world, brought together by loss, love and honor.

Biography

Nathan is a filmmaker and visual journalist based in Brooklyn. He currently works in the video department of The New Yorker. His work has been featured in The New York Times, TIME magazine, and The National Film Board of Canada.

Nathan holds an MFA in documentary storytelling from Hunter College where he was the recipient of the Welfare and Scholarship fund, and the James Aronson Award for Social Justice Journalism.

Nathan served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Micronesia doing Historic Preservation work, and still has a great fondness for breadfruit.

Jun 21, 2017

George and Face2Face host David Peck talk about love, gratitude, celebrity and rebellion and influence, “earned fear”, how you can be angry for good reasons, U2 and why poverty is so not necessary.

More about The Strombo Show here.  

More about George here.

Biography

A six-time Gemini Award and Canadian Screen Award winner for best host in a talk series, George Stroumboulopoulos has interviewed a who’s who of entertainment icons, world leaders and respected thinkers.

George has also taken an active role in global initiatives and is a strong advocate for social issues.

George is the first Canadian National Ambassador Against Hunger for the United Nations World Food Programme. And he’s one of three Canadians recognized by the World Economic Forum as a Young Global Leader for 2012.

He was also a driving force behind Canada for Haiti, a live benefit that raised more than 27 million dollars for Haitian earthquake victims, and One Million Acts of Green, which saw Canadians register 1.6 million acts of green on the official website.

Along the way, George has interviewed Hollywood legends such as Oprah, Tom Cruise, Keanu Reeves, Michael J. FoxClint EastwoodJodie FosterArnold Schwarzenegger, and Samuel L. Jackson; political leaders such as Hillary ClintonStephen Harper, Jean Chrétien, Sarah Palin, Brian Mulroney, Al Gore and Jimmy Carter; critically acclaimed authors including Christopher Hitchens, Salman RushdieStephen KingPeter C. Newman and Gore Vidal; music stars Coldplay, NickelbackRobert PlantSnoop DoggTony BennettShania TwainMichael BubleIce Cube and The Foo Fighters; renowned directors including Spike LeeJames CameronDeepa Mehta, Brian DePalma, and Paul Haggis; and Hollywood breakout stars Ewan McGregorOlivia WildeBradley Cooper, Ryan Reynolds and Robert Pattinson.

As well, George took part in The Greatest Canadian TV series on CBC, hosting a documentary to make his case for the founder of medicare in Canada, Tommy Douglas. He was one of ten finalists and ultimately received the most votes from Canadians, winning by more than 50,000 votes over second-placed Terry Fox.

George has also hosted the highly regarded CBC documentary series Love, Hate & Propaganda - which examined how propaganda helped shape significant events of the 20th century, including the Second World War, the Cold War and the War On Terror.

George is the host and co-executive producer of George Stroumboulopoulos Tonight. You can find him on Twitter at @strombo as well as on Facebook.

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For more information about my podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit my site here.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

 

Image Copyright: George Strombolopolous. Used with permission.

 

 

Jun 14, 2017

Steve and Face2Face host David Peck talk about his new film Abacus: Small Enough to Jail, injustice, the 2008 financial crisis, speaking truth to power and closing the equity gap.

IMDB

Trailer

Find out more about the film here.

Synopsis

Abacus: Small Enough to Jail tells the incredible saga of the Chinese immigrant Sung family, owners of Abacus Federal Savings of Chinatown, New York.

Accused of mortgage fraud by Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance, Jr., Abacus becomes the only U.S. bank to face criminal charges in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis.

The indictment and subsequent trial forces the Sung family to defend themselves – and their bank’s legacy in the Chinatown community – over the course of a five-year legal battle.

Biography

Steve James produced and directed Hoop Dreams, winner of every major critics prize as well as a Peabody and Robert F. Kennedy Award.

Other award-winning films include Stevie, winner of the Sundance Film Festival Cinematography Award, IDFA Grand Jury Prize and the Yamagata Mayor’s Prize, among others; the Independent Documentary Association Award-winning miniseries The New Americans; Tribeca Film Festival Grand Prize winner The War Tapes, which James produced and edited; At the Death House Door, co-directed with Peter Gilbert, and winner of numerous festival awards; No Crossover: The Trial of Allen Iverson for ESPN’s Peabody winning “30 for 30” series; and The Interrupters, which won an Emmy, Independent Spirit Award and the DuPont Columbia Journalism Award, among others.

James’ most recent film, Life Itself, was named the best documentary of the year by over a dozen critics associations, Rotten Tomatoes, the Critics’ Choice Awards, the National Board of Review, and the Producers Guild of America.

Most recently, Life Itself was nominated for Emmy awards for Best Documentary and Outstanding Editing: Documentary and Long Form. 

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For more information about my podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit my site.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

Image Copyright: Steve James. Used with permission.

Jun 7, 2017

Sara Taksler and Face2Face host David Peck talk about her new film Tickling Giants, fear, politics, outrage, hope and oppression and why jokes are an easier delivery system for calling out hypocrisy. 

Trailer

IMDB

More about the film here on the website.

Synopsis:

In the midst of the Egyptian Arab Spring, Bassem Youssef makes a decision that’s every mother’s worst nightmare... He leaves his job as a heart surgeon to become a full-time comedian.

Dubbed, “The Egyptian Jon Stewart,” Bassem creates the satirical show, Al Bernameg. The weekly program quickly becomes the most viewed television program in the Middle East, with 30 million viewers per episode. The Daily Show with Jon Stewart averaged two million viewers.

In a country where free speech is not settled law, Bassem’s show becomes as controversial as it popular. He and his staff must endure physical threats, protests, and legal action, all because of jokes.

As Bassem attempts to remain on the air, keep his staff safe, and not get arrested, he continues to let those in power know they’re being held accountable. Despite increasing danger, the team at Al Bernameg employ comedy, not violence, to comment on hypocrisy in media, politics, and religion. Tickling Giants follows the team of Al Bernameg as they discover democracy is not easily won.

The young women and men working on Bassem’s show are fearless revolutionaries, who just happen to be really, really funny. No unicorns or falafel were harmed in the making of this film

Biography

A Senior Producer at The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, Taksler has pitched stories and jokes, and researched footage for over a decade. Taksler directed and produced the feature documentary, TWISTED: A Balloonamentary, a hilarious and heartwarming look at the world’s premier balloon-twisting convention, with film partner Naomi Greenfield.

After debuting at South by Southwest, Hollywood Reporter called the film “A thoroughly winning feature” and Variety hailed it as “A feel good, irony-free celebration”. Taksler’s first film, Stop the Ignorance: The Beauty That Is New Jersey, was a tribute to her home state.

Her latest documentary, Tickling Giants, will have its world premiere at the 2016 Tribeca Film Festival. A graduate of Washington University in St. Louis, Taksler can talk backwards and has a remarkable fake sneeze.

Sara’s favorite way of Tickling Giants: Using comedy to find cathartic ways to process major bummers.

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For more information about my podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit my site here.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

Image Copyright: Sara Taksler. Sarkasmos Productions. Used with permission

May 31, 2017

Jason Dudek and Face2Face host David Peck talk about root causes, Capital, impact investment, Sierra Leone, progress, opportunity and closed circuit economies.

Biography

Jason Anthony Dudek is the Co-Founder and Chief Financial Officer of Mountain Lion Agriculture, and holds an MSc from the London School of Economics where he studied smallholder Agronomics in Sierra Leone. He has spent the last 12 years working in Sierra Leone, where he helped found an innovative organisation dedicated to accountable, effective community-based development.

Jason also volunteers his time on a number of boards including as Chairman of the Catherine Donnelly Foundation, one of Canada's most innovative and effectual philanthropic foundations both in terms of programming and investment. 

Jason also has business experience in Canada, the United Kingdom and Iraq, co-founding several companies including the firm employed by the United Nations Industrial Development Organisation to conduct Iraq’s Official Investment Map in 2008. 

Find out more here: www.mlbr.org

May 24, 2017

Michelle Stevens and and Face2Face host David Peck talk about shame, suicide, trauma and empathy, the power of habit and why belief matters.

Read more about Michelle here.

Biography

Dr. Michelle Stevens, a psychologist, is the founder and director of Post-Traumatic Success, a non-profit organization dedicated to educating and inspiring those affected by psychological trauma. She is the author of Scared Selfless: My Journey from Abuse and Madness to Surviving and Thriving. 

She studied writing at New York University before earning her doctorate in clinical psychology from Saybrook University, where her thesis was honoured as the Dissertation of Distinction. Stevens has presented her research to the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation and the Los Angeles County Psychological Association, where she also received an award for Outstanding Research.

She works with survivors around the globe as a therapist, speaker, and advocate, encouraging them to heal, grow, and fight for better lives.

She lives in Los Angeles with her wife and son.

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For more information about my podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit my site.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

 

May 17, 2017

Gerry Flahive and Face2Face host David Peck talk about secrets, story, the “D” word, why he’s a 2001 fanatic and how a “real life” can be intimidating.

Biography

Gerry Flahive is a Toronto-based writer, producer and creative consultant at his media arts company, Modern Story. Until May 2014, Flahive was Senior Producer at the National Film Board of Canada, which he joined in 1981. He has done creative and storytelling consulting, strategic planning, course development and speechwriting for clients, including the Toronto Maple Leafs, Cirque de Soleil, Telefilm Canada, MaRS, TVOntario, Humber College and Giants of Africa.

His productions have won many international awards including 2 Emmy Awards, a World Press Photo Award and a Peabody Award for HIGHRISE (highrise.nfb.ca), a global interactive documentary. He produced & co-produced more than 80 documentary projects on a wide range of subjects. Major projects include the international co-production PARIS 1919, the ground-breaking Filmmaker-in-Residence multi-media project at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto, the NFB-Canadian Film Centre Feature Documentary Program, and short films for the Governor-General’s Performing Arts Awards, working with such recipients as Bryan Adams and Rush.

In the early 1990's, as Senior Communications Manager, he managed NFB involvement in the Oscars and the Sundance Film Festival, as well as corporate communications and corporate branding. 

Flahive is a frequent contributor to the Globe and Mail and has been published in Time, The New York Times and The Walrus, and many media industry publications, and is a National Magazine Award nominee for humour. He is a member of the boards of the Pages Unbound literary festival, the Toronto Irish Film Festival and the Seneca College Documentary Film Institute, and was on the Advisory Board for the MIT Open Documentary Lab report "Interactive Documentary and Digital Journalism".  

He has been a guest speaker, presenter and mentor at many international events and institutions, including MIT, the I-Docs Lab in Switzerland, the MEDIMED Documentary conference in Barcelona, and the New York Film Festival.

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For more information about my podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit my site.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

 

May 11, 2017

Shimon Dutan and Face2Face host David Peck talk about the “settlement enterprise”, racism, empathy, the West Bank and absolutes, Israel and why there’s reason for hope.

Trailer

IMDB

Synopsis

Of the grievances and grudges that plague the Middle East, no issue is more incendiary than the Jewish-only settlements that have dotted the occupied West Bank for a half-century. 

Canadian/Israeli Shimon Dotan’s acclaimed documentary The Settlers sets out to illustrate - through first-person accounts, historical footage and expert witness - how 400,000 motivated Israelis ended up in communities almost strategically placed between, and sometimes within, Arab Palestinian cities populated by the millions. It is a confounding tale of religious zeal and secular hatred, where an olive tree is an amorphous territorial border, and the burial of a stillborn baby amounts to a claim of political sovereignty over a city. 

Dotan, a professor of political cinema at NYU Graduate School of Journalism, traces 50 years of internationally-incendiary conflict to a single charismatic rabbi, Tzvi Yehuda Kook, who gave a rabble-rousing sermon just before the 1967 War, asking rhetorically "Where is our Hebron? Where is our Nablus? Where is our Jericho?" 

All those scriptural places would end up in Israeli hands, and the young disciples of Rabbi Kook, who formed themovement of the Gush Emunim, became a powerful political force who soon learned not to ask permission when it came to putting down roots in occupied territories. What follows is a history of wildly-different approaches from an Israeli government at odds with the most religious of its own people. 

Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin called the Gush Emunim, “a cancer in the democratic fabric of the state of Israel” (and was assassinated by a Jewish extremist 20 years later). At other times, the government’s approach seems to range from arms-length to secretly-enabling. 

“I made The Settlers because, in my view, the Settlement Enterprise has the most dramatic impact on the future of Israel, and the discussion about it, is often misinformed,” Dotan says. “I set out to explore the reality in the West Bank settlements. But it soon became clear that I had to go back to the roots, to where and when the West Bank settlements began.” 

Biography

Shimon Dotan was born in Romania in 1949 and moved to Israel in 1959. He grew up in Moshav Arugot, an agricultural cooperative. He then served five years in the Israeli military as a Navy Seal and went on to get his BFA at Tel Aviv University, where his student films won Israel’s Best Short Film and Best Director Awards twice. 

A Fellow of the New York Institute of the Humanities, he is an award-winning filmmaker with thirteen feature films to his credit. His films have been the recipients of the Silver Bear Award at the Berlin Film Festival (The Smile of the Lamb), numerous Israeli Academy Awards, including Best Film and Best Director (Repeat Dive; The Smile of the Lamb), Best Film at the Newport Beach Film Festival (You Can Thank Me Later) and the Special Jury Prize at Sundance (Hot House). 

Dotan has taught political cinema at the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute of New York University since 2003. He also teaches at The New School in New York City. He has previously taught at Tel Aviv University and at Concordia University in Montreal. 

Dotan is the writer and director of The Settlers, which had its world premiere at the Sundance Film Festival in 2016, and opened in Toronto, Montreal and Quebec City on March 17.

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For more information about my podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit my site.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

Image Copyright: Shimon Dutan. Used with permission.

May 9, 2017

Karen Dougherty and Face2Face host David Peck talk about William Blake, mourning, balance, existential angst and how to really “be” with someone.

Read more about Karen and her work here.

Biography

Karen Dougherty is Toronto-based psychotherapist and documentary filmmaker.

In her practice she works to help patients through periods of adversity, transition, and instability to deepen self-understanding, establish emotional regulation, and build resilience. Her key areas of interest are repetitive bad-object relations, trans-generational trauma, and existential issues. She is a Candidate at the Toronto Institute of Psychoanalysis.

As a filmmaker, Karen specializes in psychoanalytic, history, and social issue documentaries. Her current project, funded by PEPweb http://www.pep-web.org/, explores the world of Columbia University Researcher Dr. Beatrice Beebe, whose frame-by-frame video microanalysis of mother-infant communications has revolutionized our understanding of attachment.

Recent collaborations include research and consulting on the CBC POV documentary Girls Night Out, about young women and binge-drinking culture (Directed by Phyllis Ellis, produced by White Pine Productions, premiering on CBC’s Firsthand on February 25, 2016); The Nature of Things documentary The Equalizer (Kensington Communications), about sports psychology and technology (airing on March 3rd, 2016); and, also with Kensington Communications, Risk Factor, a point-of-view documentary for TVO about the psychology of risk (in production).

As a psychoanalytic consultant on documentaries she helps filmmakers tune into their subjects, listening for and capturing unconscious communications and provides guidance on dealing with trauma and maintaining boundaries.

Karen has a Master’s Degree in English Literature (McGill) and a Master’s in Psychoanalytic Studies (School of Health and Related Research, University of Sheffield).

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For more information about my podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit my site.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

 

May 6, 2017

Bronwen Hughes and Face2Face host David Peck talk about her new film The Journey is The Destination, Dan Eldon, the “global tribe”, living a life of “crowded hours”, and having no sense of the other.

IMDB

Trailer  

More about Dan Eldon here.

More about Creative Visions here.

Synopsis

The Journey is the Destination is based on the remarkable true story of the life of Dan Eldon, a photographer, artist, and adventurer.  By the age of 22, he had travelled to more than 40 countries, created fine art journals, worked with refugees, been hired as the youngest photojournalist at Reuters, fallen in love  — and accumulated more life experience than most in a lifetime.  

Inspiring and irreverent, the film tell the story of a young man coming of age to realize his purpose, and his belief that we can all create positive change.  

This film is 23 years in the making and we could not be more proud to have Kathy’s original dream become a reality.  This would not be possible without the phenomenal group of producers, the incredible director Bronwen Hughes, the cast, crew and everyone who has been part of this journey.  The journey continues…

Biography

Bronwen Hughes is a New York and Hollywood-based feature film director of Canadian and British origin.

She is currently at work on the feature film The Journey is the Destination, based on the life of artist and photographer, Dan Eldon. This epic adventure tells the story of Dan who spent his life traveling and photographing in 42 countries, inspiring young people to follow him. Like Dan, Hughes started photographing and traveling the globe from a very young age. 

Hughes’ feature Stander is based on the true story of a notorious and brilliant bank robber in 1970’s Johannesburg. This charismatic criminal became a popular hero, often robbing 4 or 5 banks in a single day. Ultimately, he was apprehended and revealed to be the captain of the South African Police. Stander stars Thomas Jane (The Punisher, Boogie Nights) and Dexter Fletcher (Lock Stock and Two Smoking Barrels). The shoot took place in Johannesburg and the Townships of Soweto and Tembisa, where Hughes directed thousands of extras in a re-creation of the riots of the apartheid struggle.

Her previous feature, Forces of Nature, starring Sandra Bullock and Ben Affleck, was made for Steven Spielberg’s Dreamworks. It is a stylish and unique romantic comedy about two strangers thrown together on a wild ride battling the elements, both trying to make it to Savannah on a deadline. Noted for its special effects sequences of slow-motion hail storms and surreal hurricanes, Forces of Nature was the Number One film in the weeks of its National and International releases.

Hughes came to the attention of Spielberg who asked her to direct Forces of Nature after seeing her first feature film, Harriet the Spy, starring Rosie O’Donnell. Made for Paramount Pictures, Harriet was released to critical and box office success, and won international prizes.

She currently has several films in development: Romeo Spy, the true story of John Symonds, one-time London policemen who became an international seducer-of-women for the KGB in the 1970’s; Firecracker Boys for Leonardo DiCaprio’s Appian Way, a truth-stranger-than-fiction story of Alaskan Eskimos exposing the nuclear conspiracy of the Atomic Energy Commission; The Dictator’s Lover, the true story of three generations of female spies; and Tropicana, a large-scale musical based on the legendary Havana nightclub.

Her production experience has taken her all over the world, from Iceland and Norway, to East and Southern Africa, to Central American Mayan ruins, and the remote peaks of the Andes. Her award-winning documentary for The Discovery Channel, Cinenova’s Machu Picchu: The Search for Lost Worlds was filmed in the jungles of inland Peru.

For television, Hughes’ prestigious pilots White Collar and Fairly Legal, both for USA Networks and Fox TV Studios, are now hit series for the network.

Hughes completed an action-packed episode of Breaking Bad, which has received Emmy’s for AMC, and several episodes of the HBO series Hung, starring Thomas Jane, who also starred in her feature film, Stander. 

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For more information about my podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit my site.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

 

Image Copyright: Bronwen Hughes. Used with permission.

 

May 5, 2017

Vaishali Sinha and Face2Face host David Peck talk about her new film Ask The Sexpert, cultural context, “women as allies”, a Doctor as a 90-year-old pioneer and the latent effects of colonialism.

IMDB

Synopsis

ASK THE SEXPERT is a feature length documentary about a highly popular 93-year-old sex advice columnist for a daily newspaper in Mumbai. Despite sex being a taboo topic in that country, the column’s brand of non-moralistic advice and humor has emboldened many to write in with their questions, the vast majority of whom seek basic information.

The columnist gains popularity even while a ban on comprehensive sex education in schools is adopted by approximately one third of India’s states.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yRR1_VU1cQ 

Biography

Vaishali Sinha Co-Directed/Produced the feature documentary MADE IN INDIA about the personal stories behind the phenomenon of outsourcing surrogate mothers to India. The film premiered at Hot Docs Film Festival and aired on PBS in 2012.

The film received several Jury awards at festivals and is currently a case study at Harvard Business School for their class on ethics. ASK THE SEXPERT is Vaishali’s second feature length documentary; a presentation by her company Coast to Coast Films.

Vaishali has also produced numerous shorts. She has received support for her films from ITVS, the MacArthur Foundation, Tribeca Film Institute, Catapult Fund, Firelight Media, Playboy Foundation, Chicken & Egg Pictures, The Fledgling Fund, Center for Asian American Media, Mozilla, Ford Foundation, Nextpix and more.

Vaishali also freelances at Videoline Productions founded by Peabody award-winning filmmaker Richard Wormser (Rise and Fall of Jim Crow). Vaishali speaks regularly at events and has acted as jury member at film festivals. In the past she has worked with women’s right group Point of View, in Mumbai. She is originally from Mumbai, and now resides in Brooklyn, NY with her husband Fred Lassen, a Music Director and their two-year-old son Luca.

May 5, 2017

 

Egil Larsen and Face2Face host David Peck talk about his new film 69 Minutes of 86 Days, The Refugee crisis, making sense of time, polarization of real issues, childlike wonder and why he still has hope.

Trailer

Hot Docs Review – calls it “Essential viewing.”

Find out more about the film here.

Synopsis

Every day, about 90 Syrian refugees arrive in Canada.

40,081 have been welcomed since November 4, 2015. (Data as of January 29, 2017)

The war in Syria has now lasted six years.

According to UNICEF, one in three of today’s Syrian children have never experienced anything but war and flight. Every week hundreds of families flee. 69 Minutes of 86 Days is the part of the story that hasn’t been told. Follow three-year-old Lean’s journey from an unfamiliar port in Greece on the edge of a beach, through passport controls, congested trains, tents, and a large field, to the quiet streets of Uppsala, Sweden.

At an unspecified port, we are led into a crowd of people through a trail of discarded lifejackets. Part of a new wave of documentaries that depict the various elements of the Syrian crisis, 69 Minutes of 86 Days takes a poignantly humanistic approach. In its quiet beauty, it unravels the physical and emotional challenges that refugee families face every day: millions of people on the run, thousands who have lost their lives and a patchwork of political power games. With this serving as the entry point to the story, the camera moves onward. Walking along a Greek highway, a little girl stands out from the crowd. Three-year-old Lean is brimming with curiosity and childlike energy. Her playful nature engages us, in stark contrast to the intimidating backdrop of Europe. Without any background information on the child and her family, one can only guess where they’ve travelled from; we naturally assume they have crossed the ocean and already seen many things. While Lean may not fully understand what she’s experiencing, her strength and optimism shine through, giving hope to those who need it the most.

Filmed from one metre above the ground, the camera captures the story from the viewpoint of the child. We are with her and her little “Frozen” backpack amongst the legs and bags belonging to the adults around her. We realize that she understands the seriousness of the journey and is on her way to a new future, but through the journey she holds onto her childlike ability to normalize her days. She sings, plays, shares a lollipop with her little sister, washes the face of her uncle and sleeps in the arms of her parents when she gets tired. The landscape changes continuously as national borders are crossed. Lean is on her way to her grandfather in Sweden and she dreams of learning to swim.

Biography

Egil Håskjold Larsen has worked as a cinematographer and director since finishing his studies in 2008. Studying fine art photography in Turkey, and finally documentary filmmaking in Norway. In 2016 he released his first documentary film Ad Astra. 69 Minutes of 86 Days is his first feature length documentary film

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For more information about my podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit my site.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

Image Copyright: Egil Håskjold Larsen. Taskovski Films. Used with permission.

 

 

May 4, 2017

Kalina Bertin and Face2Face host David Peck talk about her new film Manic, survivor guilt, family secrets, mental health issues, intimate connections and prejudice.

IMDB

Trailer

And learn more about Kalina here

Synopsis

Manic chronicles filmmaker Kalina Bertin’s struggle to make sense of the legacy of mental illness wreaking havoc over her sibling’s lives.

Convinced that her father holds a key piece of the puzzle, she sets out to find the truth about him, and discovers a man known alternately as a cult leader, a scam artist, a prophet, and a father of fifteen.

Manic invites the viewer on a compelling and intimate journey through time and through the mind, where past and present collide.

Biography

After completing her degree in film production in Montreal at UQÀM, filmmaker Kalina Bertin quickly realized that if she didn’t set out to understand the mental illness in her family it would destroy her. This process gave birth to her compelling documentary film Manic, which explores the legacy of bipolar disorder in her family.

Aiming to build empathy and awareness toward such a complex condition, she currently is directing a virtual reality experience, which will enable the viewer to explore the world of manic-depression from within.

Kalina presented this project in development at the MIT Open Documentary lab and at the MUTEK and SODEC Atelier Grand Nord VR.

Manic and ManicVR are both produced by EyeSteelFilm, a two-time Emmy award winning production company based in Montreal.

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For more information about my podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit my site.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

Image Copyright: Kalina Bertin. Eye Steel Films. Used with permission.

 

 

May 4, 2017

Daniel Zuckerbrot and Face2Face host David Peck talk about Michelangelo, The Nature of Things, capital “T” truth, documentary storytelling and science.

For more info on Reel Time Images head here.

Biography

Daniel’s first experience in the Canadian film industry was in 1974 when, while studying history of science, religion and philosophy at the University of Waterloo, he got a summer job as a researcher for a documentary. Though only 20 at the time this was far from his earliest foray into the Canadian art scene. At the age of 15 he began working as an assistant in the technical crew at Theatre Passe Muraille. This was in 1969 and Passe Muraille was the centre of avante garde theatre.

In recent years Daniel’s specifically theatre related work has been limited to directing actors in some of his productions as well as having made a number of documentaries about performers. A working magician himself for some years, he taught magic privately and for the Toronto Board of Education. He is also one of the founding board member of Magicana a registered charity dedicated to the exploration of magic as a performing art and to increasing the public’s understanding and appreciation of this art. For more information see www.magicana.com

From the early 80s, through much of the 90s he was also involved managing the organization and activities of large groups of volunteers. These activities included helping organize neighborhood newspapers in Canada and abroad (including England, Scotland, Iceland, and Jamaica). Daniel is fluent in Spanish. His interests in the history of technology have come to a happy meeting in his current experiments in textile production, dye chemistry and casting metal (copper, bronze, brass, and iron) using kilns and crucibles that he has built himself.

His creative endeavors are not limited to film or the forge. He is a writer in a range of genres and one of his short writings was published in the Spring 2011 edition of the literary journal Descant.

May 3, 2017

Neasa Ní Chianáin and Face2Face host David Peck talk about her new film School Life, mentorship, a more relational pedagogy, nursery rhymes and belonging.

IMDB

Trailer

Find out more about the film here.

Synopsis

This observational documentary follows a year in the lives of two inspirational teachers at Headfort, the only primary-age boarding school in Ireland. Housed in an 18th century estate, school life embraces tradition and modernity.

For John, rock music is just another subject alongside Maths, Scripture and Latin, taught in a collaborative and often hilarious fashion. For his wife Amanda, the key to connecting with children is the book, and she uses all means to snare the young minds.

For nearly half a century these two have shaped thousands of minds, but now the unthinkable looms: what would retirement mean? What will keep them young if they leave?

Biography

Neasa Ní Chianáin started directing in 2001 with television documentaries. She has directed three feature documentaries, including the award-winning Frank Ned & Busy Lizzie, which won Best Feature award at The Celtic Film Festival 2004 and sold to broadcasters around the world; Fairytale of Kathmandu, which world premiered at IDFA 2007 in the Silver Wolf Competition and was subsequently invited to 25 international festivals and won 3 international awards; The Stranger, which premiered in Locarno FF 2014; and her most recent film, School Life, which had its world premiere in the Feature Documentary Competition at IDFA in November 2016.

Co-Director:

David Rane has produced award-winning documentary feature films, including Fairytale of Kathmandu (2007), The Stranger (2014), School Life (2016), animated films, including the BAFTA-winning Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (2002), and short fiction films. His company, Soilsiú Films, is a regular recipient of Creative Europe funding, and has had work screened in France, Germany, Netherlands, Belgium, Finland, and the U.S. David is the founder and festival director of Guth Gafa International Documentary Festival.

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For more information about my podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit my site.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

 

Image Copyright: Soilsiú Films. Used with permission.

 

 

May 3, 2017

Kyoko and Face2Face host David Peck talk about her new film Tokyo Idols, Tokyo “idol culture”, loneliness, relationships, clever business models and how to find love in hyper modern societies.

IMDB

Trailer

Find out more about the film here.

And learn more about Kyoko here.

Synopsis

“IDOLS” has fast become a phenomenon in Japan as girl bands and pop music permeate Japanese life. TOKYO IDOLS - an eye-opening film gets at the heart of a cultural phenomenon driven by an obsession with young female sexuality and Internet popularity.

This ever-growing phenomenon is told through Rio, a bona fide "Tokyo Idol" who takes us on her journey toward fame. Now meet her “brothers”: a group of adult middle aged male super fans (ages 35 - 50) who devote their lives to following her—in the virtual world and in real life. Once considered to be on the fringes of society, the "brothers" who gave up salaried jobs to pursue an interest in female idol culture have since blown up and have now become mainstream via the internet, illuminating the growing disconnect between men and women in hypermodern societies.

With her provocative look into the Japanese pop music industry and its focus on traditional beauty ideals, filmmaker Kyoko Miyake confronts the nature of gender power dynamics at work. As the female idols become younger and younger, Miyake offers a critique on the veil of internet fame and the new terms of engagement that are now playing out IRL around the globe.

Biography

Born in Japan, Kyoko Miyake studied history at Tokyo University and then moved to Britain to research the history of witchcraft at Oxford. Her film Brakeless won a Peabody Award after airing on PBS and BBC.

Her first film, My Atomic Aunt, was supported by the Sundance Institute Documentary Fund, BBC, WDR, and NHK, and it was recently broadcast on PBS. Hackney Lullabies won the Berlin Today Award at the 2011 Berlin International Film Festival.

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For more information about my podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit my site.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

Image Copyright: Kyoto Miyake. Eye Steels Films. Used with permission.

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