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Face 2 Face with David Peck

I believe that good conversation can create change. They can also be fun and engaging, full of insights and unexpected outcomes. And you're never quite sure where they're going to lead. Intimate dialogue assumes authenticity, transparency and dealing with substantive and sometimes difficult questions. I try to do that with Face2Face.
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Now displaying: September, 2016
Sep 28, 2016

Bob Phillips

Bob and I talk about residential schools, urban reconciliation, why he was thrown out of Burnamthorpe Collegiate some 55 years ago and how colonialism still is having its impact.

Biography

Dr. Bob Phillips (Great Bear) is a Non-Status Urban Micmac who was raised in the west end of Toronto.

He is a Traditional Pipe Carrier who began university at age 51 and now holds a PhD in Indigenous Studies.

Bob Phillips was also the host and producer of the AVR Arts Review Show for ten years on the Aboriginal Voices Radio Network where he discussed art, culture and contemporary issues with community members from across Canada and the Far North.

Read this article for a little more background on Bob and his past.

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For more information about my podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit my site here.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

 

 

Sep 27, 2016

Adrian Sitaru

 

Adrian and I talked about his new film “The Fixer”, journalism, abuse, slavery, human behaviour and why sometimes compassion is not enough.

 

For more information about TIFF go here.

 

IMDB

Trailer

 

Synopsis

 

A headline-grabbing sex scandal gives a Romanian trainee at a French news network an opportunity for his big break, in this charged moral drama from Romanian director Adrian Sitaru.

 

At the heart of The Fixer lies a cautionary moral tale — on the surface a realist procedural in the vein of the Dardenne brothers, Adrian Sitaru's film is imbued with the signature minimalist approach of the Romanian new wave. Using journalism as his lens, Sitaru asks us to reflect on how far we're willing to go, and who we're willing to hurt, to get ahead in a competitive world.

 

Romanian-born Radu Patru (Tudor Istodor) is a trainee at a prestigious French news network. Serving as a translator and general problem solver, or "fixer," for the headlining journalists during his trial period, he's looking to make his big break. He sees his opportunity when two underage Romanian prostitutes are repatriated from France, creating an international scandal. Taking advantage of his language skills and local connections, Radu is prepared to do whatever it takes to interview one of the young girls. But as he ventures into tricky moral ground, he must stop to ask himself if, as an aspiring journalist, he can live with the consequences of his actions, and if, as a father, he's setting a good example for his son.

 

Though the imposing buildings and socio-economic policies of Romania's communist past loom over Sitaru's characters, universal themes firmly anchor The Fixer in the present. Claudia and Adrian Silisteanu's intelligent script uses engaging conversations and telling interactions — both inside and adjacent to the film's central narrative — to paint a fulsome picture of Radu's world. Naturalistic performances, combined with a desaturated colour palette and fluid hand-held photography, add to the film's authentic feel.

 

Exploring rich moral ground, Sitaru seamlessly connects themes of fatherhood, journalism ethics, and the class politics of contemporary Europe. Sitaru never preaches to his audience, instead inviting us, along with his characters, to make our own conclusions.

 

Biography

 

Adrian Sitaru was born in Deva, Romania. He has directed several features for television and short films. His debut feature, Hooked, screened at the Festival.

 

His other films include Domestic, Illegitimate and The Fixer.

 

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For more information about my podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit my site here.

 

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

 

Sep 26, 2016

 

Todd Minerson

 

Todd and I talk about masculinity, gender violence, “calling out versus calling in”, the business case for doing it “right”, and why Jack Layton believe you need a dream to live beyond yourself.

 

Biography

 

Todd Minerson is the Executive Director of the White Ribbon, the world’s largest effort of men and boys to end men’s violence against women. He is also the CEO of Parker P. Consulting, a social enterprise wholly owned by White Ribbon, working on gender issues with the private sector.

 

Initiated in Canada in 1991, the White Ribbon now has a presence in over 65 countries around the world.

 

The White Ribbon symbolizes a man’s pledge to never commit, condone, or remain silent about violence against women.

 

Todd’s work on engaging men and boys in gender based violence prevention and the pursuit of gender equality has taken him around the world.

 

His also work includes numerous engagements with the United Nations, including as a member of the UN Women Global Civil Society Advisory Group. Todd is also a member of the Province of Ontario’s Permanent Roundtable on Violence against Women, and the Advisory Council for A Federal Strategy on Gender-Based Violence with the Government of Canada. Recently Todd was elected as the Co-Chair of the Global MenEngage Alliance, a group of 600 NGOs working on gender equality issues with men and boys.

 

Of all these accomplishments he is most proud of being a father, a husband, and a really average hockey player.

 

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Please visit my website for more information on my podcasting, writing and public speaking.

 

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

 

 

 

Sep 24, 2016

Jonas and I talked about refugees and memory, about ambient noise, poetry, the new film I Had Nowhere To Go, and why he's spent a lifetime ignoring Hollywood.

For more information on I Had Nowhere To Go (IMDB) and TIFF.

Synopsis

Internationally acclaimed multimedia artist Douglas Gordon (24 Hour PsychoZidane: A 21st Century Portrait) returns to the Festival with this intimate portrait of avant-garde cinema legend Jonas Mekas.

"An adventurer can always return home; an exile cannot. So I decided that culture would be my home." Jonas Mekas

Internationally acclaimed multimedia artist Douglas Gordon returns to the Festival with an intimate portrait of Jonas Mekas, the legendary poet, film critic, risk-taking curator, "the godfather of the American avant-garde cinema" -- and, at 93 years old, among the remaining few to have escaped and survived Nazi persecution.

I Had Nowhere to Go plunges us into both a collective and individual space of memory via long, imageless stretches over which Mekas narrates, in his inimitable voice, excerpts from his memoir (which lends the film its title).

An extraordinary life story emerges as the film zigzags between Mekas' early years in a forced labour camp and a Displaced Person centre during WWII and his arrival in New York as a young Lithuanian émigré. With an immersive sound environment and intermittent, fleeting images that stand in evocative juxtaposition to Mekas' anecdotes, Gordon's film reveals in its subject a puckish humour that outweighs despair, and an unabated zest for life that both illuminates and softens the sadness.

A deeply moving tribute from one great artist to another and a singular work in its own right, I Had Nowhere to Go has timely resonance today as mass migratory movements are displacing millions of people throughout the world as refugees, exiles, and stateless persons. While Mekas is certainly no ordinary person, the story he tells is a profoundly humble one, as much about daily survival as it is about aspiring to accomplish so much more. Gordon, who is ingenious at activating memory and the cinematic imaginary, compellingly presents quotidian moments outside of Mekas' famous film-related activities in order to reveal the desires, impulses, melancholy, and perseverance that inform Mekas' filmmaking and infectious love of cinema.

Even when truly having nowhere to go, Mekas always saw brief glimpses of beauty as he was moving ahead.

Biography

Jonas Mekas - Writer

Jonas Mekas born December 24, 1922, is a Lithuanian-born American filmmaker, writer, and curator who has often been called "the godfather of American avant-garde cinema." His work has been exhibited in museums and festivals across Europe and America. In 1944, Mekas left Lithuania because of war. En route, his train was stopped in Germany and he and his brother, Adolfas Mekas, were imprisoned in a labor camp in Elmshorn, a suburb of Hamburg, for eight months. The brothers escaped and were detained near the Danish border where they hid on a farm for two months until the end of the war. After the war, Mekas lived in displaced person camps in Wiesbaden and Kassel.

From 1946-48, he studied philosophy at the University of Mainz and at the end of 1949, he emigrated with his brother to the U.S., settling in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, New York.

After his arrival, he borrowed the money to buy his first Bolex 16-mm camera and began to record moments of his life. He discovered avant-garde film at venues such as Amos Vogel's pioneering Cinema 16, and he began screening his own films in 1953 at Gallery East on Avenue A and Houston Street, and a Film Forum series at Carl Fisher Auditorium on 57th Street.

In 1954, he became editor of Film Culture, and in 1958, began writing his "Movie Journal" column for The Village Voice. In 1962, he co-founded Film-Makers' Cooperative (FMC) and the Filmmaker's Cinematheque in 1964, which eventually grew into Anthology Film Archives, one of the world’s largest and most important repositories of avant-garde films. The films and the voluminous collection of photographs and paper documents (mostly from or about avant garde film makers of the 1950-1980 period) were moved from time to time based on Mekas' ability to raise grant money to pay to house the massive collection.

He was part of the New American Cinema, with, in particular, fellow film-maker Lionel Rogosin. He was heavily involved with artists such as Andy Warhol, Nico, Allen Ginsberg, Yoko Ono, John Lennon, Salvador Dalí, and fellow Lithuanian George Maciunas.

In 1970, Anthology Film Archives opened on 425 Lafayette Street as a film museum, screening space, and a library, with Mekas as its director. Mekas, along with Stan Brakhage, Ken Kelman, Peter Kubelka, James Broughton, and P. Adams Sitney, begin the ambitious Essential Cinema project at Anthology Film Archives to establish a canon of important cinematic works. Mekas' own output ranging from narrative films (Guns of the Trees, 1961) to documentaries (The Brig, 1963) and to "diaries" such as Walden (1969); Lost, Lost, Lost (1975);Reminiscences of a Voyage to Lithuania (1972) and Zefiro torna (1992) have been screened extensively at festivals and museums around the world.

In 2001, he released a five-hour long diary film entitled As I Was Moving Ahead.

Martin Scorsese said once: "Jonas Mekas is the one that gave me the desire and strength to be a director."

Douglas Gordon - Director

Douglas Gordon's practice encompasses video and film, installation, sculpture, photography, and text. Through his work, Gordon investigates human conditions like memory and the passage of time, as well as universal dualities such as life and death, good and evil, right and wrong. Gordon's oeuvre has been exhibited globally and his film works have been presented at many competitions, including the Festival de Cannes, the Toronto International Film Festival, and the International Venice Film Festival. Gordon received the 1996 Turner Prize, the Premio 2000 prize for best young artist at the 1997 Venice Biennale, and the 1998 Hugo Boss Prize.

Most recently, in May 2008 he was awarded the Roswitha Haftmann Prize by the Kunsthaus Zurich and, in 2012 the KätheKollwitz Prize from the Akademie der Künste, Berlin. Gordon was the International Juror at the 65th International Venice Film Festival, and in 2012 he was the Jury president of CinemaXXI at the 7th International Rome Film Festival. In December 2014 Douglas Gordon and pianist Hélène Grimaud have joined forces to explore the beauty of water in an extraordinary performance at Armory on Park, New York.

The collaboration continued when Gordon directed the theatre performance Neck of the Woods starring Charlotte Rampling and Hélène Grimuaud at the 2015 MIF - Manchester International Festival, Manchester. Born in Scotland, Gordon lives and works in Berlin and Glasgow and teaches film at the Städelschule in Frankfurt am Main. He is represented internationally by Gagosian Gallery, as well as Untilthen in Paris, Galerie Eva Presenhuber in Zürich, and Dvir Gallery in Tel Aviv

Sep 24, 2016

Avi and I talked about his brilliant and beautiful new film Past Life, and letting go, about justice, pessimism and why he believes we need to "let life take over."

For more information about Past Life(IMDB) and TIFF.

Synopsis

In the fascinating new film from director Avi Nesher (The Wonders), two Israeli sisters delve into the dark mystery of their father's former life in Poland during World War II.

The newest film by Avi Nesher boldly charts dangerous emotional territory as it tells of two sisters trying to uncover their family's past.

It is 1977, and talented but introspective singer Sephi Milch (Joy Rieger) is singing with her choir in a Berlin concert hall. At the reception afterwards, Sephi is shocked when an older woman, upon hearing Sephi's name, hisses "murderer." The woman is immediately hustled away by her son, but the incident haunts Sephi, and when she returns home to Tel Aviv, she shares the story with her older sister, Nana (Nelly Tagar). A fiery tabloid journalist with a political bent, Nana immediately wants to investigate.

Sephi relates the incident to her parents, too -- and it causes an uproar, with her authoritarian father finally confessing that he had another name and life in Poland during the Second World War. But Nana is unwilling to accept their father's tale of survival and loss at face value. The search for the truth of their family's past raises almost-unbearable questions for the sisters: is our father who he says he is? If he's not, who is the man who raised us? And will we bear the spiritual weight of his troubled past?

The story is fascinating right up to its last revelations, and the performances keep us engaged from the first frame. A familial detective story about family, secrets, and identity, Past Life will occupy thoughts and conversations long after the credits roll.

Biography

Avi Nesher studied international relations at Columbia University. His films include The Troupe (1979), She (1982), Timebomb (1991), Turn Left at the End of the World (2004), The Secrets (07), The Matchmaker (2010), and The Wonders (2013), the latter three of which screened at TIFF.

For more information about my podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit my site here.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

Sep 21, 2016

Ashley and I talk about her new film Werewolf, choices and addictions, modern existentialism, Albert Camus and about "paying attention."

For more information about TIFF go here.

IMDB

Trailer

Synopsis

Blaise and Nessa are outcast methadone users in a small town that doesn't offer an easy way out. Each day starts in a long lineup at the tiny pharmacy, then it's door ­to­ door begging to cut grass for people who just want them to go away and die.

At dusk they push their rusty lawnmower up a steep hill and crash in a filthy camper at the edge of town. In this bleakness, Nessa plots an escape, while Blaise lingers closer and closer to relapse, arrest, hospitalization, or worse. Tethered to one another, their getaway dreams are kept on a very short leash.

Biography

Ashley McKenzie ​is an emerging writer­/director from Cape Breton Island, Canada. Her 2015 short 4 Quarters screened at TIFF, VIFF, Stockholm IFF, Festival du nouveau cinema, and won Best Short Film at the Atlantic Film Festival. With her previous work, Stray ('13), When You Sleep ('12), and Rhonda's Party ('10).

Ashley has earned a spot on Canada's Top Ten Shorts list by TIFF, been a three-­time recipient of the Shaw Media Fearless Female Director Award from the National Screen Institute of Canada, and won CBC's Short Film Faceoff.

She is an alumnus of the TIFF Talent Lab and co­-owner of grassfire films.

Werewolf is her first feature film.

For more information about my podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit my site here.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

Sep 21, 2016

Today we talk about a documentary which engages politics and religion, the Gaza Strip, the Middle East, and why surfing is a brilliant metaphor for community and change.

For more information about Gaza Surf Club (IMDBtrailer) and TIFF.

Synopsis of Gaza Surf Club

This handsome and heartfelt documentary takes us into the world of the Gaza Strip’s surfing enthusiasts, and reveals a formidable resilience pulsing within a beleaguered population.

Caught between Israel and Egypt, assailed by airstrikes and rockets, the Gaza Strip has been called "the world's largest open-air prison." But Gaza is also bordered by the Mediterranean, and the sea's majestic white caps are drawing a new generation to the country's coastline to taste freedom in the rolling surf. This heartfelt documentary from directors Philip Gnadt and Mickey Yamine takes us into the world of Gaza's surfing enthusiasts and reveals a formidable resilience pulsing within a beleaguered population.

For the young surfers at the centre of Gaza Surf Club, social forces present challenges as great as any wave can. Ibrahim, a hardworking 23-year-old, has jobs as an orderly and a lifeguard, but his all-consuming dream is to construct a facility that would function as a surf club, archive, and meeting place for Gaza's youth. Ibrahim is desperate to go to Hawaii to train as a surfer and surfboard maker. There are, however, numerous obstacles. Chief among them is simply getting out of the country. Ibrahim speaks of being denied entry to Egypt five times — after paying prohibitive fees simply for the application. Another determined character is Sabah, a 15-year-old girl who loves the water and longs to surf. The sport is considered shameful for women in her conservative community, but her father hopes to give her the opportunity.

The interviews assembled by Gnadt and Yamine are candid and insightful; their visuals speak volumes about the contrasts of life in Gaza. They tour the pockmarked dirt roads and heaps of rubble. At one moment they spot an abandoned tank tread in a park that could be mistaken for public art. They then reveal the splendour of the sea and those who thrive on the rush of open water. What might seem like a fun weekend sport to some is for these young people an expression of defiance and, ultimately, hope.

For more information about my podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit my site here.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

Sep 21, 2016

Katell Quillévéré and I talk about her new film Heal The Living, science over mystery, living for our loved ones, taking care of others and the rituals of death.

For more information about TIFF go here.

IMDB

Trailer

Synopsis

Unintended consequence is the theme of this potent, pulsing drama, which draws seemingly unrelated stories together into a narrative about the moment when tragedy meets hope. Life's precariousness, its chance encounters, and the mysteries revealed by modern science all provide the foundation for Réparer les vivants. Director Katell Quillévéré brings both remarkable technique and sensitivity to this deeply moral, humanist tale, adapted from Maylis de Kerangal's novel Mend the Living, which was nominated for a Booker Prize.

The film begins in innocence as a French teenager leaves his girlfriend's apartment and joins his friends on a road trip to a seaside surfing spot. In another town, a woman receives the news that her heart condition has become more serious. Elsewhere, medical staff at a regional hospital work through the critical daily details of saving lives.

These stories are destined to intersect, but not before we are led through a series of intense and carefully balanced scenes in which people are forced to deal with the unexpected. Estranged parents, families with secrets, and children hiding news from parents (and vice-versa) become the grist of this emotionally intelligent story.

For her third feature film — her first won the prestigious Prix Jean Vigo for best feature in 2010 — Quillévéré has taken on a psychologically complex tale and told it with both technical skill and attentiveness to the nuances of human interaction. Moving easily between scenes with great control and a powerful visual imagination, she transforms Réparer les vivants into a deeply moving experience.

Biography

Katell Quillévéré was born in Abidjan, Ivory Coast. She studied cinema and philosophy at the University of Paris 8.

Her films include the shorts À bras les corpsL'Imprudence, and L'Échappée, and the features Un poison violentSuzanne, and Réparer les vivants.

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For more information about my podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit my site here.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

 

Sep 21, 2016

Maya and I talk about her important new film Forever Pure, racism, religion and hate, Israel, the cost of remaining silent, and politics as sport.

Forever Pure recently premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival. For more information about the festival go here.

Watch the trailer.

Synopsis

Beitar Jerusalem F.C. is the most popular and controversial football team in Israel, the only club in the Premier League never to sign an Arab player. Midway through the 2012-2013 season, a secretive transfer deal by the owner, Russian-Israeli oligarch Arcadi Gaydamak, brought two Muslim players from Chechnya.

The deal inspired the most racist campaign in Israeli sport that sent the club spiralling out of control. One season in a life of this famed club is a story of Israeli society, personal identity, politics, money and a window into how racism is destroying a team and society from within.

Biography

Maya Zinshtein is an Israeli filmmaker and journalist, who emigrated from Russia during her childhood. She now lives in Tel Aviv.

She holds a BA in Cinema and French studies, and an MA in Security and Diplomacy from Tel Aviv University. She has produced documentaries, includingThieves by Law (by Alexander Gentelev, ARTE/ZDF), the inside story of Russian Mafia, and Operation Successor (By Alexander Gentelev, Channel 1, Israel), about the 2008 presidential elections in Russia.

For years as an investigative journalist (Haaretz newspaper) she covered many of the ills of Israeli society and directed investigative stories for Israeli channels.

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For more information about my podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit my site here.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

Sep 21, 2016

Raoul Peck

 Raoul and I talk about white privilege, consumerism and class economics, apathy and ignorance and how most issues are not about guilt, but about “knowing”.

 For more information about TIFF go here.

 IMDB

 Synopsis

 Working from the text of James Baldwin’s unfinished final novel, director Raoul Peck (Moloch TropicalMurder in Pacot) creates a stunning meditation on what it means to be Black in America.

 In 1979, James Baldwin wrote a letter to his literary agent describing his new endeavour: the writing of his final book, Remember This House, recounting the lives and successive assassinations of his friends Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King, Jr. Baldwin was not able to complete the book before his death, and the unfinished manuscript was entrusted to director Raoul Peck (Moloch Tropical, Murder in Pacot) by the writer's estate.

 Built exclusively around Baldwin's words, Peck's I Am Not Your Negro delves into the complex legacy of three lives (and deaths) that permanently marked the American social and political landscape. Framing the unfinished work as a radical narration about race in America, Peck matches Baldwin's lyrical rhetoric with rich archival footage of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements, and connects these historical struggles for justice and equality to the present-day movements that have taken shape in response to the killings of young African-American men including Trayvon Martin, Tamir Rice, Mike Brown, and Amir Brooks.

 Exploring what it means to be Black in America today, Peck reflects on the legacy of racial violence that still permeates the country.

 In Baldwin's words, "You cannot lynch me and keep me in ghettos without becoming something monstrous yourselves. And furthermore, you give me a terrifying advantage: you never had to look at me; I had to look at you. I know more about you than you know about me. Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced." By revealing the deep connections between past and present injustice, I Am Not Your Negro weaves an epic narrative about America's irrational relationship with skin colour — a relationship that would be absurd were it not so tragic.

  Biography

 Raoul Peck was born in Port-au- Prince, Haiti. His many films includeHaitian Corner (88), The Man on the Shore (93), Sometimes in April(05), and the documentary Fatal Assistance (13). His films Lumumba(00) and Murder in Pacot (14) screened at the Festival. I Am Not Your Negro (16) is his latest feature.

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 For more information about my podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit my site here.

 With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

Sep 17, 2016

Half a Man

 

Kristina and Maja and I talk about their beautiful new film Half a Man, the Balkan War, innocence, overcoming trauma, denial and what family is really all about.

 

TIFF Runs from: September 8th – September 18th, 2016

 

For more information about the festival go here.

 

Trailer

 

Biography

 

Kristina Kumric

 

Kristina Kumrić graduated design at the Faculty of textile technology of the Univeristy of Zagreb and later Film and TV directing at the Academy of dramatic art in Zagreb. She is the author of several short fiction and documentary films. Her short documentary “Welcome to Igrane” won a special jury prize at the Vukovar Film Festival, 1st jury prize at Liburnia Film Festival and best film awards at FRKA festival. Kristina has been working with the Croatian Radiotelevision and since 2013 she is a lecturer at the Culturology department of the University of Osijek in Croatia.

Maja Hrgovic

 

MAJA, born in Split, Croatia in 1980, is an award winning fiction writer, journalist and cultural activist. Her first short story collection “Pobjeđuje onaj kojem je manje stalo” (he who cares less, Profil, Zagreb 2010) won the national Kiklop award (2010.) for the best newcomer of the year.

 

In November 2013 her novel „Živjet ćemo bolje“ (we shall live better, Arteist, Zagreb, 2013) was published and adapted for theatre (ZKM, Zagreb, January 2016., directed by Senka Bulić). She is also the author of the essay collection „Žena, majka, glupača“ (woman, mother, emptyhead, Arteist, Zagreb, 2014), in which she explores gender stereotypes in Balkan politics, media and pop-culture.

 

Her fiction has been included in several collections, including the anthology “Best European Fiction 2012” (edited by Alexandar Hemon and published by Dalkey Archive Press) and The Granta Magazine. She was nominated for the European Prize for Literature in 2015.

 

Her journalistic work has been represented in numerous international media, including the book “Identity: The Search for Belonging in a Changing Europe”. In 2009. she was awarded the first prize for journalistic excellence (Journalistic Excellence Award by Balkan Investigative Reporting Network).

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For more information about my podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit my site here.

 

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

Sep 16, 2016

Khushboo Ranka and Vinay Shukla

 

We talk in this interview about Khushboo’s and Vinay’s new brilliant film “An Insignificant Man”, about social and political change and why India is a “very ambitious project”, inequality and hope and why these two young directors want

 TIFF Runs from: September 8th – September 18th, 2016

 For more information about the festival go here.

 

Trailer

IMDB

 

Biography

Khushboo Ranka

Khushboo Ranka was born in Mumbai and studied documentary filmmaking at Goldsmith's College in London. She has directed the short film Continuum (06) and co-wrote Ship of Theseus (12), which screened at the Festival. An Insignificant Man (16) is her first documentary feature.

 

Vinay Shukla

 Vinay Shukla was born in Raipur, India and studied at Mumbai University. He has directed the short film Bureaucracy Sonata (11).An Insignificant Man (16) is his first documentary feature.

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For more information about my podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit my site here.

 

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

Sep 12, 2016

Kulvir Gill

 

Kulvir and I talk about generosity, the biggest delusion of humanity, our authentic selves and how the right thing can be done in the right way,

 

Biography

 

Kulvir Singh Gill is a Senior Principal with Clareo Partners, a corporate strategy and innovation management consultancy. He has over 15 years of consulting and mining industry experience. Mr. Gill started his career with Oliver Wyman as a management consultant before holding several positions with Barrick Gold Corporation’s supply chain and organizational effectiveness teams. 

 

Mr. Gill serves as the Chair of the Board of Directors for William Osler Health System Foundation and was previously on the board of Habitat For Humanity Brampton.

 

He is also the co-founder of the Seva Food Bank and coordinates the annual Toronto Sikh Retreat for Sikh-Canadian youth. Mr. Gill holds a B.Sc. and a B.Comm from the University of Calgary. He was a 2010/11 Action Canada fellow and is a recipient of the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal.

 

Mr. Gill currently lives with his wife, two young sons and parents in Brampton, Ontario.

 

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Please visit my website for more information on my podcasting, writing and public speaking.

 

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

 

 

 

Sep 10, 2016

Marko Papic

 

Marko and I talk about our multi-polar world, risk, why he reads the news for a living, American hegemony, and why “should” is a four letter word.

 

Biography

 

Marko Papic joined BCA Research in September 2011 and is the Chief Strategist of BCA’s Geopolitical Strategy service. Marko launched Geopolitical Strategy in March, 2012, a service that blends BCA’s macroeconomic research with the geopolitical methodology, with the goal of avoiding bias and providing investment-relevant forecasts. The GPS service is the financial industries only dedicated geopolitical strategy.

Prior to joining BCA he was a Senior Analyst for STRATFOR, a premier global intelligence agency where he contributed to the firm’s global geopolitical strategy as well as its analyst recruitment and training program. Before joining BCA, he also helped create the Center for European Union Studies at the University of Texas at Austin.

 

Marko holds graduate degrees from the University of Texas at Austin and the University of British Columbia, and has lived in 8 countries on 3 continents.

 

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Please visit my website for more information on my podcasting, writing and public speaking.

 

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound

 

 

Sep 9, 2016

Petr and I talk about his new film Never Alone and about choice, fascism, ideological issues that concern us all and why he’s still an optimist.

 

TIFF Runs from: September 8th – September 18th, 2016

 For more information about the festival go here.

 

Trailer

IMDB

 

Biography

 Petr Vaclav graduated from Prague Film Academy FAMU. His short documentary MADAME LE MURIE (1993) was nominated for Student Academy Award.

 Vaclav ́s first feature film, MARIAN (1996) - the story of a Romani child - won the Silver Leopard and the FIPRESCI Award in Locarno and other prizes at Angers, Thessaloniki, Belfort, Cottbus, Bratislava and Tehran film festivals, and had theatrical release in France, the Netherlands, the USA and South Korea.

 His second feature, PARALLEL WORLD, (2001) was selected for the San Sebastian Official Competition.

 His recent feature THE WAY OUT about a young Romani woman fighting for an ordinary life was screened at Cannes (ACID Selection 2014) and released in France under the name ZANETA.

 Petr is currently finishing his latest feature SKOKAN. His documentary CONFESSION OF THE VANISHED, portraying Czech composer Josef Myslivecek (1734-1781) was released in April 2015 and is the part of the work on Vaclav ́s ambitious project, Il BOEMO

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 For more information about my podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit my site here.

 

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

Sep 7, 2016

Nick Saik

 

Nick talks about his new film Know GMO, drought resistant crops, weed management and rational optimism versus irrational pessimism.

 

Synopsis

A 90-minute science based documentary that shows the public what the words “Genetically Modified Organism” really mean; Know GMO examines the real world challenges of Organic food production globally. We want to know: has biotechnology contributed to global food security? Are new agriculture technologies actually decreasing disease? Are they conserving land? Can it all really be done in a sustainable manner? We’ve set out to improve the public understanding of sustainable agricultural tools spanning Organic and Genetically Modified food production all across the globe.

Know GMO is a film about different points of view. This film is really three films in one. It’s a story about Genetically Modified Food, and how it’s been setup as the antithesis of Organic Food. It’s a story about fathers and sons, how Director Nick Saik and his father, Rob Saik have taken on this project together, and must resolve their differing views on the world and its food supply. It’s also a story about truth versus belief. In today’s world, the speed of a conversation, and the desire to contribute to it, has taken priority over actively listening to an alternate view and understanding it. We’ve seen a general retraction from the knowledge that science has given us, and this film aims to examine and understand that retraction.

In all the story lines of the film the objective is to find truth and seek the understanding that comes when two perspectives can be reconciled into a common view. In Know GMO, we are trying to see if the values that lead to Organic methods of production have anything to do with the values that allow Bio-Technology (GMO) to exist as a tool in the food supply chain. This endeavour will take Nick, and Rob, to various agricultural centres around the world. They will gain depth in their understanding of the world ’s requirement for food. Agriculture in Hawaii, Kenya, Uganda, Argentina, all have specific needs and concerns to address, and they all have different views on the use of GMO technologies to help solve problems.

The film uncovers the definition of quality in food as it’s seen by different individuals, organizations, and countries. Understanding what quality means from different perspectives will allow Nick to reconcile the values of GMO supporters and Organic supporters. During this production it becomes extremely evident that there are positive attributes to support various viewpoints. GMO and Organic do not end up being mutually exclusive, neither do Rob’s or Nick’s ideas, and neither does truth and belief.

Belief, tempered with truth ends up showing Nick that his Dad’s ideas about quality in food are valid, and that conservative ideals cause quality to be seen in a certain way. It also shows Rob that Nick has an understanding of this GMO/Organic debate that came from a young liberal curiosity of the world’s food needs. A father and a son have found some common ground that not only they can comfortably share, but it might just have enough space in it for the rest of the world too. Know GMO aims to help Organic supporters and GMO supporters find enough understanding to contribute to solving the world’s food problems without so much fear in the discussion.

For more info here: www.knowgmothemovie.com

Biography

 

Born in Alberta, Canada and raised in an agricultural household, Nick fostered an appreciation for the stories found in the Ag industry and began working with his father Rob Saik in the early 2000’s to tell the story of Agriculture through film.  

 

After graduating in 2009 with an applied degree in Cinematography from Red Deer College Motion Picture Arts program, Nick co-directed and photographed a feature length documentary shot in Sudan called The Ladder of my Life, produced by Unveil Studios Inc.  Nick learned a great deal about capturing extraordinary stories with the smallest possible crew and dealing with less than ideal shooting situations - an experience that proved invaluable during the production of KNOW GMO.

 

By 2012, after much time working with small cameras mounted in interesting places, Nick developed an innovative shooting technique using GoPro Cameras mounted to hula hoops.  This technique gained Nick significant recognition in the GoPro filming community, and started a worldwide shooting trend.  Nick has licensed this shot for several different productions around the world, such as Adult Swim’s Off the Air - Body

 

In 2013, Nick and his wife Toni moved to Vancouver to experience another facet of filmmaking. Nick completed IATSE 669’s Camera Trainee Program and spent time working on major productions in the Vancouver area as a Camera Trainee.  Having experienced the smallest and largest scales of filmmaking, Nick now had the perspective to choose a scale of production that best suited him and launched Nick Saik Productions. KNOW GMO is the company's first feature length film. 

Today, Nick is once again based in Red Deer Alberta.  HIs experiences lead to the conclusion that his place is in the Prairies, and his passion lies in capturing and relating the rich and diverse nature of his home province, and specifically the Agriculture industry.

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For more information about my podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit my site here.

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

 

 

 

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