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Face 2 Face with David Peck

I believe that good conversation can create change. They can also be fun and engaging, full of insights and unexpected outcomes. And you're never quite sure where they're going to lead. Intimate dialogue assumes authenticity, transparency and dealing with substantive and sometimes difficult questions. I try to do that with Face2Face.
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Now displaying: February, 2016
Feb 24, 2016

 

Holly Gordon

 

Listen in as Holly talks about women’s empowerment, the power of storytelling, why education is important, the gap between head and heart and why things change when you create room for conversation.

The Film: Girl Rising

Watch the Trailer here

Biography

As Co-Founder and CEO of Girl Rising, Holly determines long-term strategy for the campaign and looks for new opportunities to drive change for girls around the world. Holly is also an Executive Producer of the Girl Rising film. Holly has been selected by Fast Company as a member of the League of Extraordinary Women and named by Newsweek/Daily Beast as one of 125 Women of Impact.


Forbes Magazine also named the Girl Rising movement the #1 Most Dynamic Social Initiative of 2012. Prior to Girl Rising, Holly Gordon worked at the Tribeca Film Festival, and before that at ABC News, where she was a producer and booker for the major news broadcasts, covering high-profile stories, including the trial of Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh, the shootings at Columbine, and the September 11th attacks. Holly graduated from Brown University, with a B.A. in International Relations.


http://girlrising.com/

 

Feb 24, 2016

 

Doug talks about how you politics is defined by what you see out your front window, why he’s against the death penalty, political satire in the US and his new book President Blog.

Biography

Doug Magee is a writer, photographer, and filmmaker living in New York's East Harlem. He is a graduate of Amherst College and Union Theological Seminary. He has had a decidedly checkered career.

Doug worked as a freelance photojournalist for a number of years and was published in many major magazines and newspapers, including a New York Times front-page photo of violence in Portugal.

He is the author of SLOW COMING DARK, a book of interviews with death row inmates, and WHAT MURDER LEAVES BEHIND, profiles of families of murder victims. In addition, he has written three children's books.

His films include the HBO movie SOMEBODY HAS TO SHOOT THE PICTURE and the Showtime movie BEYOND THE CALL.

He is married to Mary Hedahl, the director of development at Human Rights First. The eldest of his three sons, Tim Magee, an associate professor at Westchester Community College, is married to Julie Tant Magee and they are the parents of William and Natalie. Joey Magee is in his third year at Oberlin College. Jackson Magee is in his first year at Allegheny College. All three sons are left-handed.

Doug is passionately opposed to state-sanctioned killing and hopes to see this archaic punishment abolished in his lifetime.

He has been a Yankees fan his entire life and doesn't plan to change any time soon.

He plays softball with the Writers Guild of America East team and trombone with the East River Jazz Band, both badly.

Doug loves his neighborhood, New York's Spanish Harlem. Visit when you're in New York. It's one of the beating hearts of the city.

NEVER WAVE GOODBYE, his first novel, was published in June 2010. His second novel, DARKNESS ALL AROUND, was published in October 2011, and will be out in paperback on June 19, 2012.

Read more about the book here.

 

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For more information about my podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit my site here.

 

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound.

 

Feb 17, 2016

 Karen talks about uncertainty, the frozen smile, anxious attachment, trans-generational trauma, good parenting and about learning how to self regulate.

 Biography

 Karen Dougherty is Toronto-based psychotherapist and documentary filmmaker.

In her practice she works to help patients through periods of adversity, transition, and instability to deepen self-understanding, establish emotional regulation, and build resilience. Her key areas of interest are repetitive bad-object relations, trans-generational trauma, and existential issues. She is a Candidate at the Toronto Institute of Psychoanalysis.

 As a filmmaker, Karen specializes in psychoanalytic, history, and social issue documentaries. Her current project, funded by PEPweb http://www.pep-web.org/, explores the world of Columbia University Researcher Dr. Beatrice Beebe, whose frame-by-frame video microanalysis of mother-infant communications has revolutionized our understanding of attachment.

 Recent collaborations include research and consulting on the CBC POV documentary Girls Night Out, about young women and binge-drinking culture (Directed by Phyllis Ellis, produced by White Pine Productions, premiering on CBC’s Firsthand on Thursday, March 3, 2016 at 8PM on CBC); The Nature of Things documentary The Equalizer (Kensington Communications), about sports psychology and technology (airing on Thursday, March 3, 2016 at 8PM on CBC); and, also with Kensington Communications, Risk Factor, a point-of-view documentary for TVO about the psychology of risk (in production).

 As a psychoanalytic consultant on documentaries she helps filmmakers tune into their subjects, listening for and capturing unconscious communications and provides guidance on dealing with trauma and maintaining boundaries.

 Karen has a Master’s Degree in English Literature (McGill) and a Master’s in Psychoanalytic Studies (School of Health and Related Research, University of Sheffield).

 For more information, visit www.karendougherty.ca

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For more information about my podcasting, writing and public speaking please visit my site here.

 

With thanks to producer Josh Snethlage and Mixed Media Sound

 

Feb 10, 2016

 

Photo credit: Véro Boncompagni

 

Check out the trailer of their new NFB film Ninth Floor making its world premiere at TIFF 2015.

 

Synopsis of Film

It started quietly when a group of Caribbean students, strangers in a cold new land, began to suspect their professor of racism. It ended in the most explosive student uprising Canada had ever known. Over four decades later, Ninth Floor reopens the file on the Sir George Williams Riot – a watershed moment in Canadian race relations and one of the most contested episodes in the nation’s history.

It was the late 60s, change was in the air, and a restless new generation was claiming its place– but nobody at Sir George Williams University would foresee the chaos to come.

On February 11, 1969, riot police stormed the occupied floors of the main building, making multiple arrests. As fire consumed the 9th floor computer centre, a torrent of debris rained onto counter-protesters chanting racist slogans – and scores of young lives were thrown into turmoil. Making a sophisticated and audacious foray into meta-documentary, writer and director Mina Shum meets the original protagonists in clandestine locations throughout Trinidad and Montreal, the wintry city where it all went down. And she listens. Can we hope to make peace with such a painful past? What lessons have we learned? What really happened on the 9th floor?

In a cinematic gesture of redemption and reckoning, Shum attends as her subjects set the record straight – and lay their burden down. Cinematography by John Price evokes a taut sense of subterfuge and paranoia, while a spacious soundscape by Miguel Nunes and Brent Belke echoes with the lonely sound of the coldest wind in the world.

 

Mina Shum: Biography

Born in Hong Kong and raised in Canada, Mina Shum is an independent filmmaker and artist. “I’m the child of the Praxis Screenwriting Workshop, Cineworks Independent Film Co-op, the Canadian Film Centre and working class immigrant parents,” she says.

With Ninth Floor, a production of the National Film Board of Canada, Shum has written and directed her fourth feature film and first feature documentary.

Her first feature Double Happiness (1994) – developed while she was resident director at the Canadian Film Centre – premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival, where it won a Special Jury Citation for Best Canadian Feature Film and the Toronto Metro Media Prize. It went on to win Best First Feature at the Berlin Film Festival and the Audience Award at the Torino Film Festival. Following its American premiere at Sundance, it was released theatrically in the U.S. by Fine Line/New Line Features. It was nominated for multiple Genie Awards, Canada’s top film honour, winning Best Actress for Sandra Oh, and Best Editing for Alison Grace.

Shum’s second and third features – Drive, She Said (1997) and Long Life, Happiness and Prosperity (2002) – also premiered at the Toronto Film Festival. Long Life, Happiness and Prosperity was subsequently invited to both Sundance and the Vancouver Film Festival, where it won a Special Citation for Best Screenplay (shared with co-writer Dennis Foon). It was released theatrically in Canada and the U.S.

Shum’s short films include Shortchanged; Love In; Hunger; Thirsty; Me, Mom and Mona, which won a Special Jury Citation the 1993 Toronto Film Festival; Picture Perfect, nominated for Best Short Drama at the Yorkton Film Festival; and most recently I Saw Writer’s Guild Award.

Her TV work ranges from Mob Princess, a TV movie produced for Brightlight Pictures/W Network, to episodic directing on About A Girl, Noah’s Arc, Exes and Oh’s, Bliss, The Shield Stories and Da Vinci’s Inquest.

Shum’s interests extend beyond film and television. Her immersive video installation You Are What You Eat was held over at the Vancouver Centre for Contemporary Asian Art, Centre A, and her cinematic theatre piece All, created in collaboration with the Standing Wave Music Ensemble, was presented at the 2011 Push Festival. She has hosted sold-out events for the experimental Pecha Kucha program, and her Internet hit Hip Hop Mom was featured in Calgary’s official Canada Day celebrations.

In 2004 she was invited to deliver the inaugural UBC/Laurier Institute Multicultural Lecture, entitled New Day Rising: Journey of a Hyphenated Girl, and in 2011 she was the recipient of the Sondra Kelly Writer’s Guild of Canada Award.

She is currently preparing her next feature, Meditation Park.

 

Selwyn Jacob: Biography

Selwyn Jacob was born in Trinidad and came to Canada in 1968 with the dream of becoming a filmmaker. It was a dream that wouldn’t die: he became a teacher and eventually a school principal but eventually chose to leave the security of that career to educate a wider audience through film. He has been a producer with the National Film Board of Canada since 1997.

His early work as an independent director includes We Remember Amber Valley, a

documentary about the black community that existed near Lac La Biche in Alberta. Prior to joining the NFB, he directed two award-winning NFB releases – Carol’s Mirror, and The Road Taken, which won the Canada Award at the 1998 Gemini Awards.

In 1997 he joined the NFB’s Pacific & Yukon Studio in Vancouver, and has gone on to produce close to 50 NFB films. Among his many credits are Crazywater, directed by the Inuvialuit filmmaker Dennis Allen; Hue: A Matter of Colour, a co-production with Sepia Films, directed by Vic Sarin; Mighty Jerome, written and directed by Charles Officer; and the digital interactive project Circa 1948, by Vancouver artist Stan Douglas.

Released in 2010, Mighty Jerome addresses issues of race and nationalism while paying tribute to Harry Jerome, one of the most remarkable athletes in Canadian history. The film went on to win multiple honours, including a Leo Award for Best Feature Length Documentary and the 2012 Regional Emmy Award for Best Historical Documentary.

 

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